World-Famous Clydesdales

Running Clydesdales

American Icons

They heralded a new era of prosperity for Anheuser-Busch, and a weary nation’s return to optimism. From their first appearance in 1933 to their enduring presence on the American landscape, the Clydesdales are more than the symbol of Budweiser beer; they are the living embodiment of America’s great industrial spirit.

Clydesdales Heritage

QUINTESSENTIAL DRAFT HORSES

More than 300 years ago, this imposing breed was first developed for farm work in the region of Clydesdale, Scotland. They are most easily recognized for their substantial feather - the long hairs of the lower leg that cover the hooves. Despite a dressy appearance, they are capable of pulling a 1-ton load at 5 MPH.

ORIGINS

The Budweiser Clydesdales made their first-ever appearance on April 7, 1933. A gift from August A. Busch, Jr. and Adolphus Busch to their father in celebration of the repeal of Prohibition, the presentation of the original two six-horse hitches of champion Clydesdales moved father, sons and drivers to tears.

Origins
Drawing Beer and Crowds

DRAWING BEER & CROWDS

No strangers to television broadcasts and parades, the Budweiser Clydesdales have figured prominently in two Presidential inaugurations. They appeared in Missouri native Harry Truman’s inaugural parade in 1949, and then again for Bill Clinton’s in 1993.

A CLYDESDALEʼS BEST FRIEND

In 1950, the Budweiser Clydesdales received their very own mascot: the Dalmatian. Traditionally used to guide horse-drawn fire carts, this spotted dog serves as friend and companion to the team, sitting aside the driver. To see if they are visiting near you, check out the hitch schedule.

A Clydesdales Best Friend
Clydesdales Heritage Mobile

QUINTESSENTIAL DRAFT HORSES

More than 300 years ago, this imposing breed was first developed for farm work in the region of Clydesdale, Scotland. They are most easily recognized for their substantial feather - the long hairs of the lower leg that cover the hooves. Despite a dressy appearance, they are capable of pulling a 1-ton load at 5 MPH.

Origins Mobile

ORIGINS

The Budweiser Clydesdales made their first-ever appearance on April 7, 1933. A gift from August A. Busch, Jr. and Adolphus Busch to their father in celebration of the repeal of Prohibition, the presentation of the original two six-horse hitches of champion Clydesdales moved father, sons and drivers to tears.

Drawing Beer and Crowds Mobile

DRAWING BEER & CROWDS

No strangers to television broadcasts and parades, the Budweiser Clydesdales have figured prominently in two Presidential inaugurations. They appeared in Missouri native Harry Truman’s inaugural parade in 1949, and then again for Bill Clinton’s in 1993.

A Clydesdales Best Friend Mobile

A CLYDESDALEʼS BEST FRIEND

In 1950, the Budweiser Clydesdales received their very own mascot: the Dalmatian. Traditionally used to guide horse-drawn fire carts, this spotted dog serves as friend and companion to the team, sitting aside the driver. To see if they are visiting near you, check out the hitch schedule.

BREWERY EXPERIENCES COME FOR THE TOUR, STAY FOR THE BEER

Our Farmers

  • Nearly 100% of our barley comes from America’s Farmers
  • We’re investing billions in cutting-edge innovations
  • Working hand-in-hand with American farmers to raise the next generation of barley
 

Our Legacy

  • Our founder, Adolphus Busch, journeyed to America from Germany in 1857, determined to make his dreams come true.
  • After fighting for the Union during the Civil War, Adolphus joined his father-in-law’s business, bringing big, ambitious ideas with him.
  • In 1879, the company’s name was officially changed to Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association. After Eberhard’s passing in 1880, Adolphus became president.
  • Before Budweiser was introduced, many Americans were drinking heavy, dark ales. But St. Louis summers were hot – perfect for a palatable, crisp lager.
  • Budweiser’s smoothness and drinkability was a success. Budweiser quickly became wildly popular not just in St. Louis, but in America. And we’ve stayed true to the recipe ever since.

 

In 1879,

The company's name was officially changed to Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association. After Eberhard's passing in 1880, Adolphus became president.

Before Budweiser was introduced,

many Americans were drinking heavy, dark ales. But St. Louis summers were hot – perfect for a palatable, crisp lager.

Budweiser’s smoothness

and drinkability was a  success. Budweiser quickly became wildly popular not just in St. Louis, but in America. And we’ve stayed true to the recipe ever since.